HOMO FABER: COME I METALLI HANNO SEGNATO E SEGNANO ANCHE OGGI LA CIVILTÀ DELL’UOMO

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Rinaldo Psaro *
(*) Autore principale:
Rinaldo Psaro | rinaldo.psaro@istm.cnr.it

Abstract

The succession of various ages, from those of copper to that of bronze, then iron and so on, is dictated by the chemical properties of the various metals and, ultimately, by the periodic table of the elements. The capacity expressed by the homo faber to extract and work the different metals, have marked technological developments so radical as to be chosen by historians to designate real civilizations. Gold was the first metal used by man, although it could not be used either as a tool or as a weapon. More than any other ancient element, gold has always been associated with a timeless charm. None of the chemical elements discovered by modern science has been able to overcome its supremacy. Since the time of its discovery, gold has been used for ornamental purposes and only with technological development has it been used also for technical and scientific purposes. For titanium, however, the reverse path was verified, from its essentially technological use it then moved on to the artistic one. Starting in the 1960s, when titanium became available even for non-military uses, its applications have done nothing but grow and diversify. His artistic fame is unquestionably linked to the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao designed by the architect Frank Gehry in 1997, while in Pedeferri’s titanochromies we have the combination of art and technology.


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